SDG Compendium: SDG 1 - No Poverty

Learn About SDG 1 – No Poverty (Early Years – Year 3)

End poverty in all its forms everywhere LEARN about the SDG 1 by clicking on the following link:

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Learn About SDG 1 – No Poverty (Year 5 – Year 8)

End poverty in all its forms everywhere LEARN about the SDG 1 by clicking on the following links:

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Learn About SDG 1 – No Poverty (Year 9 – Year 11)

End poverty in all its forms everywhere LEARN about the SDG 1 by clicking on the following links:

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Follow Up SDG 1: Jack and the Beanstalk (Early Years – Year 2)

–     Watch/ listen to the story of Jack and the Beanstalk –        After the story ask the children:

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Follow Up SDG 1: Feelings and poverty (Year 3 – Year 4)

–        Craft idea! Eco Tip! You can use old boxes and water caps to do this craft idea! Prepare this craft item with your siblings/ parent/ guardians: Proceed to this link.

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Follow Up SDG 1: Chocolate production (Year 5 – Year 8)

–        Do you love chocolate??? Watch this video with siblings and family members to learn about chocolate production: What is the name of the tree from which we can make chocolate? What is the name of the tool used to cut the pods? How difficult do you think this job is?

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Follow Up SDG 1: Fair Trade! (Year 5 – Year 8)

Have you ever heard about Fair Trade? Would you be able to recognise the logo?

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Follow Up SDG 1: Cupboard treasure hunt – Continuation on Fairtrade (Year 5 – Year 8)

With your parents/ guardians permission open your kitchen cupboards and try to find as many items as you can that have the Fairtrade mark.

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Follow Up SDG 1: The Banana split game – Continuation on Fairtrade (Year 5 – Year 8)

If one of your parents/ guardians or a delivery person brings green groceries to your door, check the bill and try to find out the price you paid for one banana. How much do you think the persons working on the plantations get from the price you pay for that banana? Go to this link and play this game. Try to understand if people along the supply chain are getting their fair share?

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Follow Up SDG 1:  The weekly wages of famous football stars! (Year 9 – Year 11)

Are you a football fan? Ronaldo or Messi? Which is your favourite football club? The most talented player? Look at the picture with the football stars to check their weekly wages. Impressed?! Now read this information below (Source:United Nations) More than 700 million people, or 10% of the world population, still live in extreme poverty and is struggling to fulfil the most basic needs like health, education, and access to water and sanitation. The majority of people living on less than $1.90 a day live in sub-Saharan Africa. –        Do you think this is fair? Why? –        Some famous football players donate large amounts of money to charities and organisations that assist the poor and marginalised groups. –        So what harm is there in these exorbitant wages if the players donate part of their wage to charities? Now watch this video? You’re in for a surprise! What do you think Cristiano Ronaldo is doing here? Is he trying to send us a message or is he just trying fooling us? Send us your comments! We’re very eager to hear your views.

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Follow Up SDG 1:  Malta ‘inflates’ Official Development Aid figures by 50% (Year 9 – Year 11)

EU countries like Malta are expected to send ODA – Official Development Assistance to developing countries to assist people who are poor and marginalised. In 2016 it was reported that Malta together with other EU countries were not really providing as much support to those in need. Malta claimed that it is already spending a lot with the refugees that are reaching the island. Read this article. What are your views about this? Wasn’t Malta already doing enough? Isn’t this a heavy burden for Malta already? Why does Malta have to fork more money as ODA when it has to deal with the costs of providing food and shelter for refugees arriving by boats in their hundreds? –        Download this NSO document: The European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) survey Look at the picture – Almost 90,000 people at risk of poverty, according to EU data If Malta’s credit rating is so high, how is it that we are still having such a large number of people at risk of poverty? What is so wrong about this? Aren’t the policymakers doing enough to assist these people? Are there any organisations that are trying to assist? In what way? In your opinion what else could be done? What can students really do to help alleviate this situation? Share your thoughts with us!

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