SDG Compendium: SDG 4 - Quality Education

Follow Up SDG 4 – A time-bomb! (Year 9 – Year 11)

What is the state doing to assist these students? One of the plans to try and respond to these needs is the My Journey vision. Download the document from this link to investigate if this new vision truly responds to the needs of these students. Can you find anything in this document that is similar to those you have set in your SMART goals template? Besides the My Journey vision the Ministry has also launched the ALP – Alternative Learning Programme. Try to browse on the internet to check what it entails. Here is a video that you might find helpful. What do you think? Is the programme catering for any of the needs mentioned in the absenteeism document? A statement that we came across about the effectiveness of this programme is; ‘A time bomb ready to explode!’ To see why and to read about the Ministry’s reaction go to this link. What is your opinion? Discuss!

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Playing truant! (Year 9 – Year 11)

Absenteeism in Malta. In which year did schooling become compulsory in Malta? Carry out some research to find an official date. Over the years the education system in Malta has changed a lot. Yet some students do not attend school. Download and read this document. Browse through the document to find out the main reasons why students are skipping school. Find them and list them. Imagine that you are the Minister for Education and Employment. Choose ONE reason from the list and try to think of a SMART way how to get these students back. Download the SMART goals template form from the attachments and set yourself a plan to respond to ONE of the needs to convince students to return to school.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Child labour! (Year 9 – Year 11)

Watch this video: Special report: Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children After these children were discovered working in appalling conditions they were re-traced to offer them a schooling opportunity… Special report: Revisiting the cobalt-mining boys The boarding school is 100 miles away but his father agrees to give his son a chance just the same. How do you think Dorsen’s father feels? How does Dorsen feel? Dorsen might be saved for now as thanks to the media coverage he received people felt really sorry for him ….but what about the thousands of children having to work in atrocious conditions and missing school? What chance do they stand? Are there any companies that are trying to minimise these bad conditions?  Trying to obtain raw materials like cobalt from a more sustainable source? Without having to resort to child labour? When you start nagging for your first mobile or to buy a new one do you ever consider if any child was harmed in the production lines? Is there a way you can know? Are there any labels that puts your mind at rest that no child/ worker was harmed or treated unfairly in the production of your mobile phone? Can you carry out some research to find out if such labels exist?

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Malala – The voice of 66 million girls (Year 9 – Year 11)

Around the world 66 million girls wish they could go to school, however unfortunately for various reasons they cannot. Brainstorm together with your elder siblings and/or parents/guardians to try and make a list of what the barriers to education for these girls might be. Now watch this video to find 13 reasons why girls are not in school. Did you guess any of them? Now watch this video. It is around 26 minutes long BUT it is really worth watching. Malala Yousafzai: Nobel Peace Prize Lecture 2014 Why should girls go to school? Why is it important for them? Why shouldn’t they have the right to go to school? During her Nobel Prize speech Malala mentions the 17 Sustainable Development Goals but still finds a lot of shortcomings. Can you mention just a few? Can you find ONE of her most salient quotes in this memorable speech and create a poster with a speech bubble to share it with your family and friends to raise more awareness about the importance of education for all. For further reading you may wish to borrow or buy the book: I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban There is also a Maltese version.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – COVID 19 assistance! (Year 5 – Year 8)

The school closure has left a number of students stranded. Many lessons are now being delivered online but some students do not have any laptops and no internet access. The Ministry for Education and Employment has launched a scheme to assist these students. Access this link and watch the embedded video. How many households will be provided with a free internet service? How many students will be getting a laptop on loan to participate in online learning? In what ways do the meals provided by this initiative assist in providing a quality education for these students? Each SDG has a number of specific targets. Carry out some research to find out all the targets of SDG No 4. How many targets are there? Which of these targets will this initiative be fulfilling?

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Unfair play! (Year 5 – Year 8)

Read the story: Iz-Zokkor!   You can also listen to the voice recording by downloading the mp3 file. MP3 player file will also be sent upon request. Have you ever stopped to think from where the soccer balls you kick around at home, at school or at the football nursery come from? Where are they made? Who makes them? Do you have any idea??? FACTS ABOUT THE SOCCER BALL INDUSTRY Nearly 1/2 of the world’s soccer balls are made in Sialkot, Pakistan There are 650 stitches in 1 soccer ball It is estimated that 1/4 of the 35 million soccer balls made in Pakistan are made by children under the age of 14 In India, although it is illegal to keep children from going to school, tens of thousands of children work in the soccer ball industry, working 10-15 hours a day stitching together soccer balls Children miss school to stitch together soccer balls In India, the work is done at home, making child labour “invisible” Children as young as 6 years old have been found stitching soccer balls Children earn roughly 25c for every ball they stitch together.  It takes about 4 hours to stitch one ball.   This is the reality of some children in Meerut India. Browse online to try and check how much an average soccer ball costs from a local Sports shop? What percentage do you think these kids get from the selling price of each soccer ball? Luckily there are some companies that produce fair trade soccer balls. They make sure that no children or other people were abused in the production. Customize your own soccer ball with your favourite team colours with the fair trade logo included by accessing this link. 

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Children on the move! (Year 5 – Year 8)

Build an understanding of what life is like for people forced to flee their homes. Understand that migration has and continues to affect everyone from this publication.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Education can transform the World! (Year 5 – Year 8)

Why is education such an important tool? To understand the power of education for transforming lives refer to this publication.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – 10 crazy ways to go to school! (Year 3 – Year 4)

We all have our bad days! Sometimes we wake up and we don’t really feel like going to school. Sometimes we complain that kids in Malta and Gozo have to wake up VERY early to catch the bus for school which shouldn’t be! BUT……. Did you know that some kids in different parts of the world miss school so much that given the chance they would go even if it is very difficult to reach and the journey to school is so dangerous. Watch the following videos to try and understand how difficult it is for them to make it to school: Kids who risk their lives going to school How students risk their lives to learn What about those students that are not mobile, have to use mobility aids such as crutches or are wheelchair users? How on Earth are they supposed to do these crossings? Team up with one of your siblings or parents/ guardians and choose one of the situations in the video. Imagine that you have arrived at this village and met these children. Think of ways how you can assist them to make the crossing less dangerous. Ask yourself….Are you still having a bad day??? Now watch this video to learn how after long distances kids are so tired and hungry that it is very difficult for them to concentrate. How can these kids be further assisted once they get to school?

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Superheroes in action! (Year 3 – Year 4)

Do you miss school? Did you know that some kids never attend school? Join Chakra and Mighty Girl on their journey to Mumbai to discover why some kids never get the chance to attend school. – Watch here. Press on the zoom button to be able to read the speech bubbles! Now you know why some kids are not able to attend school. So it’s time to create your own superhero character by logging in here. Create and download your superhero character and save for the next step! Now login to this site to create a speech bubble. Close the ads window and scroll down! Upload your superhero character picture and add a speech bubble. Write a short message to students that cannot attend school because: they are sick/ they are injured/ they live very far away from school/ their school has been bombed/ their parents have lost their job so they cannot pay for their school uniforms and books…. Send them a strong message in your speech bubble. Save, download and if you want print!

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Fonzu l-Fenek (Early Years – Year 2)

A children’s song in Maltese featuring a day in the life of Fonzu l-Fenek. Kanzunetta bil-Malti għat-tfal dwar ġurnata tipika ta’ Fonzu l-Fenek. Sing along to the song and watch with your kids through this link. Show them the below picture with the caption:   Follow up questions you can ask: Is Fonzu a healthy rabbit? What makes you think so? What kind of food does Fonzu eat? Are fruit and vegetables healthy? How much should we eat a day? If we go to school on an empty stomach what might happen to us? Did you know that some kids manage to go to school but some are so tired and hungry by the time they get there that they hardly learn anything. So let us remember to eat a healthy breakfast before we go to school! Sing the song one more time!

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Obstacle race! (Early Years – Year 2)

Use the chairs and some old boxes you have at home and any other items to create an obstacle race for your kids. The main aim is to arrive safely at your destination which in this case is your school. At first you might want to make the journey quite easy and then start introducing an obstacle at a time. You can also stick the ‘reasons’ flashcards from the previous activity to each item on the obstacle course and explain why this obstacle hindered your child to arrive safely. Another variant could be to use an old pushchair to double up as a wheelchair to have them do the obstacle course in it and ask them how it feels like for students with disabilities. You can involve other siblings at home by dressing them up as animals and having them pounce on their sibling doing the obstacle race to simulate attacks from animals on their journey to and from school. At the end of the activity print out the school to home maze and ask them to find their way back home from school.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – Il-gideb ta’ Toninu! (Early Years – Year 2)

Read the Maltese poem attached.   Why do you think Toninu wants to skip school? Do you enjoy going to school? Why? Now that you have to stay at home because of the virus do you miss school? What do you miss most about your school? Did you know that some children around the world cannot go to school every day? Why do you think it is not always possible for them to go to school? To help them answer this question you might want to show them this episode of Thomas the Train. Ask again after the video and if they have trouble coming up with an answer freeze at 0:47 and have them listen again or else read the transcript below: But unfortunately, not all children are able to go to school. In some places, families can only afford to send some of their children to school, and sometimes they choose to send boys instead of girls. Other times, children can’t go to school, because schools are too far away, or because the weather has damaged the roads, or there’s fighting going on where they live. You can also prepare flashcards with these ‘reasons’ hindering adequate access to schooling and ask them to hang them up with pegs on a clothes line across the room.

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Follow Up SDG 4 – This is the way we go to school! (Early Years – Year 2)

Sing along to this song.   Watch it together and mime it with your kids!  

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Learn About SDG 4 – Quality Education (Year 9 – Year 11)

Ensure Inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.   LEARN about SDG 4 by clicking on this link. For all the details and statistics about the targets of SDG No 4 access this link.  

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Learn About SDG 4 – Quality Education (Year 4 – Year 8)

Ensure Inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.   LEARN about SDG 4 by clicking on these links: ‘What can you do’ youtube video on SDG4 ‘Education for all’ youtube video on SDG4 For all the details and statistics about the targets of SDG No 4 access this link.

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Learn About SDG 4 – Quality Education (Early Years – Year 3)

Ensure Inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.   LEARN about SDG 4 by clicking on this link. For all the details and statistics about the targets of SDG No 4 access this link.  

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